industrialdesigners:

Dowling Duncan and redesigning the American Dollar:

Why the size?
We have kept the width the same as the existing dollars. However we have changed the size of the note so that the one dollar is shorter and the 100 dollar is the longest. When stacked on top of each other it is easy to see how much money you have. It also makes it easier for the visually impaired to distinguish between notes.

Why a vertical format?
When we researched how notes are used we realized people tend to handle and deal with money vertically rather than horizontally. You tend to hold a wallet or purse vertically when searching for notes. The majority of people hand over notes vertically when making purchases. All machines accept notes vertically. Therefore a vertical note makes more sense.

Why different colors?
It’s one of the strongest ways graphically to distinguish one note from another.

Why these designs?
We wanted a concept behind the imagery so that the image directly relates to the value of each note. We also wanted the notes to be educational, not only for those living in America but visitors as well. Each note uses a black and white image depicting a particular aspect of American history and culture. They are then overprinted with informational graphics or a pattern relating to that particular image.

$1 – The first African American president
$5 – The five biggest native American tribes
$10 – The bill of rights, the first 10 amendments to the US Constitution
$20 – 20th Century America
$50 – The 50 States of America
$100 – The first 100 days of President Franklin Roosevelt. During this time he led the congress to pass more important legislations than most presidents pass in their entire term. This helped fight the economic crises at the time of the great depression. Ever since, every new president has been judged on how well they have done during the first 100 days of their term.

(Source: blissfulgurgling)

industrialdesigners:

ALBINA / Gaia Bottari

  • When does a ladder become a piece of furniture?
    Usually designers have to shape physical objects, but sometimes they must mold people’s views too: that is surely more complicated.
    This project wants to face common custums that want the house’s ladder to be hidden in our storage.
    That’s why Albina is a proud ladder with its head held high, that wants to be exhibited with the rest of the house.
    Made of birch wood, Albina has also an optional calf’s leather bag, a wide belly to fill up.

(Source: nothingtochance)

archiproducts:

AARHUS by INCLASS: Multipurpose seating collection with modular seats and tables http://bit.ly/Y5omLQ

betype:

Thinking With Type By Ellen Lupton.

What kind of typeface should I use? How big do I set it? How should those letters, words and paragraphs be aligned, spaced, ordered and shaped? Thinking With Type answers these questions and more, providing clear guidelines for Designers, Writers, Editors and Students on how best to arrange their written content.

Type is the foundation of print and web design. Everything you need to know about thinking with type, you will find here. This richly detailed update to the classic text belongs on the shelf of every designer, writer, editor, publisher, and client.”  -Jefferey Zeldman-

Thinking with Type is the definitive guide to using typography in visual communication, from the printed page to the computer screen. This revised edition includes forty-eight pages of new content, including the latest information on style sheets for print and the web, the use of ornaments and captions, lining and non-lining numerals, the use of small caps and enlarged capitals, as well as information on captions, font licensing, mixing typefaces, and hand lettering. Throughout the book, visual examples show how to be inventive within systems of typographic form—what the rules are and how to break them. Thinking with Type is a type book for everyone: designers, writers, editors, students, and anyone else who works with words.

An official web site is set up as a classroom companion to Thinking With Type. Lupton has provided a syllabus, sample chapters, exercises and handouts for download in high-res PDF format. If you’re still not convinced about the quality of this title yet, I would suggest you head over to the site to download the sample pages and judge for yourself.

Compared to the more common encyclopaedic approach to design theory books, Thinking With Type is easy to understand, engaging and fun to read. The tone of this book is what really makes it special and is why I can’t recommend it enough.

Fin this book on Amazon:

USA: http://amzn.to/11XeNfE
UK: http://amzn.to/19sEetW

via typographybooks

(Source: bit.ly)